Thursday, August 10, 2017

Water and scams

We will need to have a well dug on our property. And it needs to be done before the house building starts because it would not be good to start building a house and find out there is no water! While we are not concerned that would happen (the well logs in the area are fine), we still want it done before building.

We have heard people say two different costs.....a couple people (one in person and one online in a video) say $10 per foot to dig. We have a couple others tell us, no, it's more like $30-$35 per foot. Big difference. If it's $10 per foot - lets get it done now. Well logs and neighbors well indicate needing to drill down about 145 feet.

DH kept saying, should we just do it now? I'm like well, if it's $10 a foot, sure. If it's $35 a foot, not yet. We don't have that much - we just spent $2800 on the site work and he knows we had $5,000. $5000-2800 does not equal another $5000 or more.  Seriously, it gets so annoying sometime. After next paycheck next week, I'll be back up to $4000 saved for it.

So, I have mentioned more than once - well call and get a quote (we have two phone numbers for 2 companies recommended in the area). We can't budget until we know what it costs! Finally, yesterday he calls one of them (used by our property neighbors and by friend who built his house a couple years ago) and it's $36 per foot and they are 3 months out. Ok, that is very most likely doable to have that extra in 3 months. Then DH says, but what if they get an opening and say they can do it in a month? Sigh.....if we don't have the money to do it then, we don't have the money. Why is that so hard to understand? You'd just have to tell them anytime after such and such date...(I'm anticipating having enough by the end of Sept)

Then I told him to call the other number and get that quote too. It's a local guy (the other one is from the city) so it's possible he might be a bit cheaper. He said he will give the other guy a call, too.

I was reading a story on Facebook about a scam pulled on a 79 year old. The scammer called and told him his grandson was in jail in his local police station, gave a phone number to call back on that is in another state and had him buy $3000 worth of Best Buy gift cards, call the number back and give them the gift card codes. Who ever has gotten bailed out of jail using gift cards? and if someone is that far gone in their mind that they would fall for that, then hopefully there is a way to set up an elderly person's phone so that they can only take incoming calls from certain numbers programmed in (family, doctors, etc.). And if you are of sound mind enough to figure out how to buy $3000 in Best Buy gift cards you'd think you'd know this is a scam. Sorry.......I'm not being very empathetic, I guess. Anytime someone I do not know calls I am suspicious. How does that end up changing when you get older?


8 comments:

  1. You would be surprised who gets taken in those scams. My MIL got taken in the publishers clearing house one and a friend of hers got taken in the computer one where they log into your computer. I believe there is a filter that goes away as we age.

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    1. there must be a filter that goes away.

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  2. I have no idea how much ours cost. The cost was rolled into our build. At this point, I don't know even how deep it is - I need to write that on a list of questions to find out. Our builder is not one to pay full price - we are behind on our cabinets because he thought they were too expensive. We finally found someone, but we are still delayed because of design.

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    1. probably good for you to know how deep it is. Was the well already there or did you guys have to put it in?

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  3. I know a set of grandparents IRL who were scammed with this very scam. They are a very intelligent couple (late 70's and very spry) and I was shocked when I heard that they fell victim to this, but it did make sense when they explained how they were taken. The scammers called the grandpa's cellphone and told him that his grandson was in jail and needed several thousand dollars for bail and that the money could be sent via iTunes cards. There were a few things that made it seem legit to the grandparents: 1) They still had a landline and only used their cellphone for personal calls and the fact that somebody was calling their cellphone made it seem personal - they assumed that their grandson gave the number to the police 2) The caller knew their grandson's name and where he lived (different city & state from grandparents) and 3) They had no idea what iTunes cards were used for and just thought it was a way to send money. This couple was so embarrassed when they talked to their daughter and realized they were scammed.

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    1. That's a bummer. There should be a special place in hell for these scammers of the elderly, for sure.

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  4. Sometimes, a person calls claiming to be a grandchild. Most people do not know the sound of a grandchild's voice, especially when the grandchild seems distressed and in trouble. I think the stress of hearing about trouble makes the person lose their focus and just send the money. I get scam calls all the time, but am still wary even at 71.

    Maybe women whose husbands made all the decisions about money matters are more vulnerable. It is sad, all the same.

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    1. yes, it's sad. I'm going to have a chat with my mom about it. Remind her not to send anyone money via phone or internet. If she has any doubts of a caller to tell them she has to check with her daughter first.

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